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FNQ Nature Tours gains private access to new Shared Earth Reserve

FNQ Nature Tours is excited to announce that they have been granted exclusive use of a 5000-acre nature reserve to share with guests.

The Shared Earth Reserve is now owned by conservation organisation Forever Wild, who work to protect Earth's last great wildernesses for societal well-being, biological diversity and its evolutionary potential and for our cultural record and economic values.

Earleir this year, FNQ Nature Tours owner and guide, James Boettcher, was successful in obtaining a commercial tour operating license. This license grants James, his team and their guests access to this incredibly diverse and expansive nature reserve, which is home to over 220 recorded bird species.

This news is particularly exciting for visiting birdwatchers, with the highest bird count in a single day reaching an impressive 98 species.

James is understandably thrilled to be able to bring guests of FNQ Nature Tours to visit this amazing locations, which he says is "critical habitat for Buff Breasted Button Quail, one of the world rarest birds." James also noted that "there is a healthy population of the endangered Northern Quoll," a species which has significantly declined in population in recent years.

The property acts as a critical resource for wildlife during the dry periods from May through to November. Ecological management of the Reserve is based on extensive science and applied knowledge.

FNQ Nature Tours is aiming to launch new birding day tours next April, that will emphasize the wetlands within the Shared Earth Reserve. These tours will offer guests a 100% unique and private experience. 

As the license has already been acquired, FNQ Nature Tours are already taking guests there. This is fantastic opportunity for those with particular interests in birdwatching to visit before the wet season begins in November/December. 

For more information on the Shared Earth Reserve, please visit the Forever Wild website or watch the video below.

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